Entrepreneurial Thought Leader Lecture

Tools

Do What You Love - Tom Kelley (IDEO)
Date: 11/12/2008
Length: 5 minutes
Speaker(s): Tom Kelley
Sources: Stanford Technology Ventures Program
Description: You won't just be happier when you follow your passionate career path; you'll be better at it. IDEO's General Manager Tom Kelley quotes author Jim Collins who identifies a Venn diagram in every career path - the overlapping
intersection of what you're good at, what you're born to do, what people will pay you to do, and finding a happy group of co-workers with whom to work. In the pursuit of self-discovery, Kelley suggests keeping a laboratory notebook tracking
the happiest moments in life to discover our own true passions.

Other Videos in Series

Case Study: Best Buy's Failure to See Napster - Tom Kelley (IDEO)
Tom Kelley
11/12/2008
Summary: "It's not what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that ain't so," says Mark Twain. And Tom Kelley, General Manager of IDEO, cites this famous quote as an example of why it's important for
creative minds to continue to cultivate a dedication to continuous learning. He tells the story of retailer Best Buy, and tracks their huge investment and acquisition of a large CD retailer which they thought was a good idea - except for that
their target market had stopped buying music and started downloading MP3's instead. The electronic retailer was overly confident in their knowledge of the market, and paid for their lack of learning with a billion dollars in lost
revenue. Watch More
Cultivating an Attitude of Wisdom - Tom Kelley (IDEO)
Tom Kelley
11/12/2008
Summary: Be confident in what you know well, but be distrusting enough of what you don't know to keep yourself learning more at all times. This axiom will keep life-long learners of innovation thirsting to know more, broaden their skill
set, and continuously second-guessing themselves in a way that will promote growth and knowledge, says Tom Kelley, General Manager of IDEO. Resting on your laurels, says Kelley, is never a good idea, and it's not served anyone - including
Caesar - very well. Watch More
Do What You Love - Tom Kelley (IDEO)
Tom Kelley
11/12/2008
Summary: You won't just be happier when you follow your passionate career path; you'll be better at it. IDEO's General Manager Tom Kelley quotes author Jim Collins who identifies a Venn diagram in every career path - the overlapping
intersection of what you're good at, what you're born to do, what people will pay you to do, and finding a happy group of co-workers with whom to work. In the pursuit of self-discovery, Kelley suggests keeping a laboratory notebook tracking
the happiest moments in life to discover our own true passions. Watch More
Field Observations with Fresh Eyes - Tom Kelley (IDEO)
Tom Kelley
11/12/2008
Summary: Design firm IDEO's General Manager Tom Kelley shares a case study that demonstrates the value opportunities that can arise when designers, innovators, and entrepreneurs see with fresh eyes. He cites his company's challenge to
design a new children's toothbrush. Rather than scaling the product back - going with the industry standard that smaller people needed a smaller product - his team did hands-on field research, and noticed that children tended to grip a
toothbrush in their fist, necessitating a chunkier, wider design. The new take on an old product re-invented it, made it the best-seller in its field, and re-designed the entire shelf spectrum of all other children's toothbrush
manufacturers. Watch More
Innovation Made Personal - Tom Kelley (IDEO)
Tom Kelley
11/12/2008
Summary: Tom Kelley, the highly acclaimed general manager of IDEO and author of best-selling books on creativity, targets his thoughts on corporate creativity to the inexperienced student - and how the young innovator can learn to foster
the nature of creativity for life. He urges entrepreneurial thinkers to resist the forces that chip away at creative energy, and encourages an effort toward innovation to remain young at heart. Watch More
Orbiting the Giant Hairball - Tom Kelley (IDEO)
Tom Kelley
11/12/2008
Summary: IDEO's General Manager Tom Kelley relays a tale about artist and author Gordon MacKenzie. In his book, "Orbiting the Giant Hairball", MacKenzie asks school children from kindergarten through sixth grade if they consider themselves
to be artists. While the enthusiasm for creative free expression seems to run freely for the youngest children, the author notes some attrition from the idea starting with the second graders, and full-blown shame for artistic expression by the
time he speaks to the sixth grade. The take-away from this exercise, says Kelley, is that we are all born with a high level of innovation, but it is the cultural norm to have these aspirations and pleasures flattened at a surprisingly young
age. Kelley assures his audience that it is, indeed, OK to be an artist. Watch More
Thinking Like a Traveler - Tom Kelley (IDEO)
Tom Kelley
11/12/2008
Summary: Like taking vitamins or exercising daily, Tom Kelley, General Manager of IDEO, points out that fostering lifelong creativity depends on instituting good, healthy mental habits. This first habit on his list of five encourages
thinkers to become hyper-aware of their environment, and to notice the common and everyday with new eyes. Capture fresh ideas and don't be afraid to use them later, he insists. Watch More
Treat Life As an Experiment - Tom Kelley (IDEO)
Tom Kelley
11/12/2008
Summary: Sometimes it works out, and sometimes it doesn't. Just ask Thomas Edison, the makers of WD-40, and vacuum guru James Dyson - who collectively tested thousands of ideas before finding a handful that stuck. But the point behind the
practice of experimentation in innovative thinking, says IDEO General Manager Tom Kelley. Take risks frequently, and be prepared in case the resulting action fails to meet your expectations. Fail forward, and there will be learning from your
mistakes along the way. Watch More
Using Your Whole Brain - Tom Kelley (IDEO)
Tom Kelley
11/12/2008
Summary: Fine tune your left brain, but don't overlook the opportunities to let your right brain make its mark. Tom Kelley, General Manager of IDEO, also discusses the use of the "hare" brain, meaning the aspects of thinking that we can
control, and the "tortoise" brain, meaning giving though processes time to sit, ruminate, and percolate to slowly process creative solutions. Kelley claims this slower level of background thinking is even smarter than our cognitive
problem-solving, and that it can be used to address dilemas directly. Creative thinkers should schedule some time for daydreaming to give these slower mental processes a chance to be effective. Watch More

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