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Understanding the Overseas Investment Market - Beth Seidenberg (KPCB)
Date: 5/28/2008
Length: 3 minutes
Speaker(s): Beth Seidenberg
Sources: Stanford Technology Ventures Program
Description: Culturally, the differences can be night and day. Financially, the rules can be completely different. Rather than trying to operate in China and jump its many hurdles from afar, KPCB partner Beth Seidenberg says her firm found the
best local entrepreneurs in the country and partnered with them, giving them the Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers brand. In India, the business community works more closely with Silicon Valley, simply assigning its partners to the ground
and forging relationships with other serial entrepreneurs.

Other Videos in Series

A Snapshot of Early Financing - Beth Seidenberg (KPCB)
Beth Seidenberg
5/28/2008
Summary: Demonstrating her lesson using a case study of a medical device company, KPCB partner Beth Seidenberg offers an illustrative example of what angel and first-round financing might look like for the upstart enterprise. Her advice
includes tips on seeking seed money, and why a small company shouldn't go out for financing too soon. Incrementally building dollars around real milestones is critical for real investment and corporate success. Watch More
Cost Differentiation of a Start-Up - Beth Seidenberg (KPCB)
Beth Seidenberg
5/28/2008
Summary: Less contingency planning, a smaller team, shorter spells of tinkering and perfectionism... Parter at KPCB Beth Seidenberg analyzes the differences in efficiencies between the corporate world and the start-up environment.
Retaining its nimble nature, says Seidenberg, is the best way for any enterprise to withstand its regular crisis cycle. Watch More
Five Metrics for Venture Success - Beth Seidenberg (KPCB)
Beth Seidenberg
5/28/2008
Summary: How do investors gauge whether a company is one from a pool of thousands worth their resources? KPCB partner Beth Seidenberg shares her firm's five measures for financial fortitude. In this clip, she outlines leadership, and how
this is the most important talisman of a growing enterprise's success. In addition, she discusses the importance of large, fast-growing, under-served markets, and KPCB's willingness to take risk with new technologies. Reasonable financing
structures and a sense of market urgency are also key indicators; being the first and being the best matters. Founders who are missionaries, not mercenaries, nearly always seal the deal. Watch More
Graduating New Technologies - Beth Seidenberg (KPCB)
Beth Seidenberg
5/28/2008
Summary: Ninety percent of KPCB's new technologies come from university research, reports partner Beth Seidenberg. But how do the pieces come together? It all may begin with a good idea, but even the most brilliant and innovative
technology needs a practical application for building a sustainable entity. Watch More
The Silicon Valley Ecosystem - Beth Seidenberg (KPCB)
Beth Seidenberg
5/28/2008
Summary: Boston and San Diego can claim some footing, but Silicon Valley is truly the hub for technological innovation, says KPCB partner Beth Seidenberg. Her venture firm is doing some work in Europe and China, but Valley culture includes
education, technical expertise, talent, and access to capital unparalleled elsewhere. To illustrate her point, Seidenberg offers a case study that compares the ecosystems of Southern California to the offerings of Northern California
universities and Sand Hill Road. Watch More
Trends in Venture Capital Interest - Beth Seidenberg (KPCB)
Beth Seidenberg
5/28/2008
Summary: In 2007, $30 billion was invested in new business, with the majority of it in California and focused on green technologies. KPCB partner Beth Seidenberg gives her take on the pulse of current venture capital areas of exploration.
Highlights include third-party applications for the iPhone, life sciences and medical innovations, pandemic preparedness and biodefense, and global initiatives. Watch More
Understanding the Overseas Investment Market - Beth Seidenberg (KPCB)
Beth Seidenberg
5/28/2008
Summary: Culturally, the differences can be night and day. Financially, the rules can be completely different. Rather than trying to operate in China and jump its many hurdles from afar, KPCB partner Beth Seidenberg says her firm found the
best local entrepreneurs in the country and partnered with them, giving them the Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers brand. In India, the business community works more closely with Silicon Valley, simply assigning its partners to the ground
and forging relationships with other serial entrepreneurs. Watch More
Who Owns What? - Beth Seidenberg (KPCB)
Beth Seidenberg
5/28/2008
Summary: Beth Seidenberg, a partner at VC firm KPCB, says that in the beginning of a company's life cycle, founders typically own the majority of a budding enterprise - often as much as 80 percent, sharing the remainder with seed funders.
But as that company continues to flower and VC investors are brought into the fold, that number can drop substantially, with firms owning anywhere from 20-60 percent. Founders are motivated to increase their ownership stake, and the only way
to accomplish this, says Seidenberg, is for them to increase the company's value overall. Watch More

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