Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders Speaker Series

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2004: Start of an Era of Optimism - Ann Winblad (Hummer Winblad)
Date: 2/25/2004
Length: 2 minutes
Speaker(s): Ann Winblad
Sources: Stanford Technology Ventures Program
Description: Winblad talks about how in 2001, there was a challenge finding consumers for software products and costs had to be cut. Now, demand is improving and CIO's are looking for larger revenue opportunities, she says.

Other Videos in Series

2004: Start of an Era of Optimism - Ann Winblad (Hummer Winblad)
Ann Winblad
2/25/2004
Summary: Winblad talks about how in 2001, there was a challenge finding consumers for software products and costs had to be cut. Now, demand is improving and CIO's are looking for larger revenue opportunities, she says. Watch More
Are Technologies Ahead of Their Time? - Ann Winblad (Hummer Winblad)
Ann Winblad
2/25/2004
Summary: Winblad talks about how VCs are generally optimistic about market uptake, so in due diligence it is important to assess whether the customers are real or imaginary. The source of most bad investments is misjudging the market risk
from competitors or timing, she says. Watch More
Customers are Key - Ann Winblad (Hummer Winblad)
Ann Winblad
2/25/2004
Summary: Winblad talks about how VCs spend a lot of time with the leaders of major technology companies to find out what they are looking for. It is important to talk to consumers early rather than late, she notes. Today's leaders are
technologically-savvy, know what they need, and are willing to tell you if you ask, she adds. Watch More
Drivers for Software Innovation - Ann Winblad (Hummer Winblad)
Ann Winblad
2/25/2004
Summary: Ann Winblad of Hummer Winblad Ventures argues that there has been a steady dealflow in venture capital from 2002-2004. The software sector is still the big leader, though biotech is catching up. Though she doesn't discuss
outsourcing, Winblad emphasizes that a company must consider where they can get the best intellectual capital. Today, company strategy starts globally. She also discusses trends in the software market, including open source material, Moore's
Law (storage is free) and Metcalf's Law, and mergers and acquisitions. Watch More
How Consumer Markets and Enterprise Markets Drive the Software Industry - Ann Winblad (Hummer Winblad)
Ann Winblad
2/25/2004
Summary: Winblad talks about how the market is driven by consumers who want connectivity across devices, customizable products, and fair prices. Communication and collaboration are key to delivering the product the consumers want, she
notes. The pricing structure cannot just be made up -- a company must demonstrate they can deliver undeniable short-term return on investment to the customer in order to justify the price. Watch More
Hummer Winblad's and Softbank's Recent Investments - Ann Winblad (Hummer Winblad)
Ann Winblad
2/25/2004
Summary: Hummer Winblad is focused on enterprise, says Winbland, and Softbank on the consumer segment. Hummer Winblad's investments include: Voltage, the BASES contest winner in 2002, in security and reliability; Cenzic, in applications
security space; two blade server companies, Scalent and Jareva; Knowmadic, in application integration; and Bridgestream, in provision and identity management. Softbank's projects include: Planitax, MessageCast, Castbridge, AuctionDrop,
Perpetual Entertainment, and Reactrix. Watch More
Introduction to Hummer Winblad and Mobius Venture Capital - Ann Winblad (Hummer Winblad)
Ann Winblad
2/25/2004
Summary: Ann Winblad, co-founding Partner of Hummer Winblad Venture Partners, introduces herself and venture capitalist Heidi Roizen, who was not able to be there. She says that now is a very exciting time for entrepreneurship because
there are lots of holes to fill in the software market and in the business landscape. She explains the founding and progress of Hummer Winblad Venture Partners and Mobius Venture Capital. Watch More
Keep Testing Your Core Assumptions - Ann Winblad (Hummer Winblad)
Ann Winblad
2/25/2004
Summary: Winblad advises entrepreneurs to boil down their business plan and tell everyone in the company the top five assumptions for success. As time goes on, turn the assumptions into facts, she says. Understand the core assumptions you
are making and keep reevaluating them, she adds. Watch More
Outsourcing Software Development to Asia - Ann Winblad (Hummer Winblad)
Ann Winblad
2/25/2004
Summary: Winblad talks about how whole projects are not outsourced. The core technology is separated and written, while incremental pieces that would be done linearly are outsourced abroad. There are a lot of talented architects and
developers around the world, she notes, but they do not have the vision to be inventors. Watch More
The Economic Context in 2004 - Ann Winblad (Hummer Winblad)
Ann Winblad
2/25/2004
Summary: According to Winblad, M&A is picking up because companies now feel they can take risks in working with younger companies. Major corporations also went through a period of downsizing, but are now adding, she
notes. Watch More
The Java Standard (and Competing Technology Standards) - Ann Winblad (Hummer Winblad)
Ann Winblad
2/25/2004
Summary: Winblad explains that companies use both a .net and a Java standard and neither has taken over. Most likely, neither will. Customers like to have a blend of technologies and programmers like to be looking at the new latest thing
so there is currently no force to change to a single standard. Watch More
The Threat of Linux to Microsoft - Ann Winblad (Hummer Winblad)
Ann Winblad
2/25/2004
Summary: Winblad believes IBM has done an extraordinary job at establishing itself as a leader in software. IBM is proactive with acquiring early stage companies and partners well. Microsoft is successful because they view everything as a
threat and don't take anything for granted, she says. Linux is still a force and will not easily go away because it is really hard to kill large companies in the software industry. Watch More
Trends in Seed and Series A Investing - Ann Winblad (Hummer Winblad)
Ann Winblad
2/25/2004
Summary: Winblad explains that very few Series A investments were done in 2002. However, a lot more were done in 2003 and will be done in 2004, she says. The reasons for the decline since 2000 include: restart dollars were competing with
the A round dollars; corporate investors disappeared (excpet Intel); and individual investing declined. Additionally, during this era, VCs were doing deals individually, creating twice as many A round deals and putting only one person on the
board. Now, A round deals are syndicated to provide more coaching, she adds. Watch More
VC Words of Wisdom for Entrepreneurs - Ann Winblad (Hummer Winblad)
Ann Winblad
2/25/2004
Summary: According to Winblad, the intellectual capital in your company and the coaching it gets is more important than money. There is a high bar for hiring employees. Most companies die of self-inflicted wounds rather than from
competition or lack of opportunity, she says. Watch More

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