Getting to Plan B (Entire Talk) - Randy Komisar (KPCB)

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A Day in the Life of Randy Komisar - Randy Komisar (KPCB)
Date: 4/7/2010
Length: 1 minutes
Speaker(s): Randy Komisar
Sources: Stanford Technology Ventures Program
Description: A specialist in early-stage ventures, Randy Komisar of KPCB describes a typical work day for himself, and offers insight into they type of contact he likes to keep with his vested interests. Of the ten CEO's he works with in a cycle, a usual day will start by touching base with three or four of them. He spends some time reviewing new potential projects; checking references, etc. And he notes that he spends a tremendous amount of time reading up on various market sectors and verticals.

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