What Great Leaders Do [Entire Talk] - Bob Sutton (Stanford)

Tools

Accept Defeat and Commit - Bob Sutton (Stanford)
Date: 11/10/2010
Length: 0 minutes
Speaker(s): Robert I. Sutton (Stanford Engineering School)
Description: Stanford Professor Bob Sutton suggests two strategies for dealing with team disagreements. Never knock down ideas during the brainstorming stage. And if a team decides to go with a decision you disagree with, be the hardest worker during the idea's implementation. By committing yourself to helping make the idea a success, if it does indeed fail in the end, you will know that it was indeed a poor idea.

Other Videos in Series

A Good Boss or a Bad Boss? - Bob Sutton (Stanford)
Robert I. Sutton (Stanford Engineering School)
11/10/2010
Summary: According to author Bob Sutton, interviews are terrible predictors of what is going to happen in a working environment. However, there are some indicators to look for to determine if a prospective supervisor will be pleasant and effective. For example, listen to the number of "I's" versus "we's" the prospective employer uses when describing a project, advises Stanford Professor Bob Sutton. Are they a team player? Will they offer credit to others? An even better strategy is to find former employees and ask them about their day-to-day experience with the supervisor in question. Watch More
Accept Defeat and Commit - Bob Sutton (Stanford)
Robert I. Sutton (Stanford Engineering School)
11/10/2010
Summary: Stanford Professor Bob Sutton suggests two strategies for dealing with team disagreements. Never knock down ideas during the brainstorming stage. And if a team decides to go with a decision you disagree with, be the hardest worker during the idea's implementation. By committing yourself to helping make the idea a success, if it does indeed fail in the end, you will know that it was indeed a poor idea. Watch More
Fighting a Bad Boss - Bob Sutton (Stanford)
Robert I. Sutton (Stanford Engineering School)
11/10/2010
Summary: Does it ever pay to tell your manager what you really think? Strength in numbers is the only way to wage war with an ineffective manager, says Stanford Professor and Good Boss, Bad Boss author Bob Sutton. Banding together with like-minded co-workers offers better documentation and carries more of a punch than an individual approach. Watch More
Hallmarks of Great Bosses - Bob Sutton (Stanford)
Robert I. Sutton (Stanford Engineering School)
11/10/2010
Summary: Stanford professor and author Bob Sutton covers a number of hallmarks and strategies of smart, in-tune bosses. While traditional management theory dictates constant monitoring of employees and processes, this may not be the best tactic, says Sutton. His research reports this is particularly true for bosses managing creative teams and employees. In these situations, over-management can backfire, often stifling creativity and innovation. Watch More
Listen to Those You Lead - Bob Sutton (Stanford)
Robert I. Sutton (Stanford Engineering School)
11/10/2010
Summary: Bestselling author and Stanford professor Bob Sutton offers insights from his book, Good Boss, Bad Boss. Two important points: 1) Individuals in a position of authority will be under intense scrutiny from those they manage; and 2) Leaders receive disproportionally more blame and more credit for organizational performance. Sutton shares some surprising statistics related to this point, and explains that the best bosses work hard to remain in-tune with those they manage. Watch More
Listening for the Truth - Bob Sutton (Stanford)
Robert I. Sutton (Stanford Engineering School)
11/10/2010
Summary: Not only can some bosses be difficult to talk to, but there are a number of institutional structures in place that make it difficult for them to hear the truth. Stanford Professor Bob Sutton bullet points many documented human behaviors that make it difficult for managers to hear the whole story. For example, research shows that people like flattery - even if its false - and people tend not to like those who deliver bad news. Watch More
Power Poisoning - Bob Sutton (Stanford)
Robert I. Sutton (Stanford Engineering School)
11/10/2010
Summary: According to author Bob Sutton, when someone is placed in a position of power, three things can happen to cause "power poisoning": 1) The individual focuses on their own needs and concerns; 2) The individual focuses little attention on the needs of others; and 3) The individual often acts like the rules don't apply to them. Evidence is also mounting, says Sutton, that the more successful a manager is, the more likely they are to break the rules. Watch More
Pruning the Rotten Apples - Bob Sutton (Stanford)
Robert I. Sutton (Stanford Engineering School)
11/10/2010
Summary: A successful personal relationship must follow the 5:1 rule: for every unpleasant interaction, at least five positive interactions are needed to offset the negative one, says Stanford Professor and author Bob Sutton. Research in the workplace also shows that just one rotten apple - or someone who repeatedly proves to be selfish - can be contagion that severely reduces overall team performance. These contagions must be removed for the health and longevity of the team. Watch More
The Toxic Tandem - Bob Sutton (Stanford)
Robert I. Sutton (Stanford Engineering School)
11/10/2010
Summary: Stanford Professor Bob Sutton discusses the "toxic tandem," which he defines as when bosses do not pay attention to their employees, while still being closely watched by those same employees. This asymmetry of attention can be devastating, and in this clip, Sutton shares an anecdote of one company team who anticipated layoffs just by reading their boss' unconscious behavior. Watch More
What Great Leaders Do [Entire Talk] - Bob Sutton (Stanford)
Robert I. Sutton (Stanford Engineering School)
11/10/2010
Summary: In this lecture that parallels his book Good Boss, Bad Boss, Stanford professor Bob Sutton unpacks the best habits of beloved and effective managers, and details the worst habits of those who fail to lead. The best leaders develop and nurture those who work for them. However, when bosses gain more power, they can easily grow oblivious to the needs of those they lead. Watch More

comments powered by Disqus

Search e360TV

Stay Connected

Email Newsletter Signup

Want to get connected? Sign up to receive regular news, polls and updates from The Kauffman Foundation.

Email Newsletters

Want to be up-to-date with the latest news and updates from Entrepreneurship.org? To subscribe, just give us your email address below; you'll choose which e-newsletters you'd like to receive on the next screen.